5 Proven Strategies To Stop Yourself From Binge Eating

Many people have a love-hate relationship with food.

The unhealthy way that many of us view food can lead to eating disorders. One such disorder is binge eating. This happens when a person periodically overeats (usually very quickly) to the point of discomfort and then feels shame or guilt afterwards.

For some, binge eating begins as a mindless habit of sitting down in front of the TV with a big bowl of popcorn or bag of chips. In time, this habit evolves into uncontrolled eating that quickly spirals into a myriad of negative consequences.

Because of the guilt and shame that is associated with binge eating and obesity, some people take compensatory measures such as severe food restrictions, purging, or extreme exercise to counter the incidence of binge eating. It can become a life-threatening disorder.

Nevertheless, with help, a person can overcome binge eating. In this article, we’ll explore the root causes of binge eating disorder and provide five proven strategies that will help you stop binge eating.

Binge eating happens when a person periodically overeats (usually very quickly) to the point of discomfort and then feels shame or guilt afterwards.

Side note: Before we move on, it’s important to know that binge eating is often recognized as an eating disorder with severe, long-term, negative health consequences. If you feel like this is a habit that’s out of control, consulting a certified medical practitioner regarding this matter is essential in order for you to get the proper diagnosis and appropriate treatment. The information given in this article is not intended to be a substitute for professional medical advice.

6 Causes of the Binge Eating Habit

1. Depression

Binge eating and depression are closely linked. In fact, the same genes that are involved in depression may also be involved in eating disorders such as binge eating. While feelings of depression can make someone eat more, it can also begin a cycle because people often feel depressed after a binge.

When you are depressed, it can be difficult to recognize emotional hunger. Once you’ve become more skilled at noticing your hunger cues, you can then determine whether the cues are occurring because of physical or emotional hunger.

Some indicators to look for include sudden (emotional) vs. gradual (physical) hunger, specific (emotional) vs. general (physical) hunger, and if the hunger is occurring in your stomach or in your mind. You also want to pay attention to how you feel after you eat….

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